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Miss America


boboneleg

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  • 1 month later...

So this morning I continued going through the bike to correct anything that had happened on my recent trip. All was going well until I took the air filter out and then saw that the 'backfire screen ' was cockeyed . Having had to replace one of these in the past on another DR650 I knew what a ballache it would be to fit it back in. Sure enough an hour later the bike was in bits ............

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It's back in now but I bloody hate that job. Anyway, it gave me the excuse to take all the electrical connectors apart and grease them while it was all apart.

 

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4 hours ago, boboneleg said:

So this morning I continued going through the bike to correct anything that had happened on my recent trip. All was going well until I took the air filter out and then saw that the 'backfire screen ' was cockeyed . Having had to replace one of these in the past on another DR650 I knew what a ballache it would be to fit it back in. Sure enough an hour later the bike was in bits ............

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It's back in now but I bloody hate that job. Anyway, it gave me the excuse to take all the electrical connectors apart and grease them while it was all apart.

 

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It just doesn't sound like it should take long!

But then neither does changing a battery on a Himalayan 😆 

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22 minutes ago, Slowlycatchymonkey said:

It just doesn't sound like it should take long!

But then neither does changing a battery on a Himalayan 😆 

It can be done just with a lot of fiddling to get the screen in from the airbox hose but as on this occasion it doesn't last, I suspect the previous owner had done just that.

To do it properly you need to remove the airbox hose, battery, battery tray, petrol tank, seat , side panels , rear inner mudguard and the electrics so that you can free the airbox enough to do the job properly.

I've never worked on a Himalayan , what's involved in removing the battery ?

 

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3 minutes ago, boboneleg said:

It can be done just with a lot of fiddling to get the screen in from the airbox hose but as on this occasion it doesn't last, I suspect the previous owner had done just that.

To do it properly you need to remove the airbox hose, battery, battery tray, petrol tank, seat , side panels , rear inner mudguard and the electrics so that you can free the airbox enough to do the job properly.

I've never worked on a Himalayan , what's involved in removing the battery ?

 

Is it an option to just ditch it altogether Bob

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40 minutes ago, Sir Fallsalot said:

Is it an option to just ditch it altogether Bob

I'll try and find the photos but I had another DR650 for a while and was horrified when I went to check the air filter.  The foam element had disintergrated and the cage that it sits on had melted .  The backfire screen was not present and I can only assume that was the cause.

 

edit:  found them.  This is the filter cage ..............

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and this shit in the carb is the remainder of the disintegrated filter ..........

 

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22 minutes ago, boboneleg said:

It can be done just with a lot of fiddling to get the screen in from the airbox hose but as on this occasion it doesn't last, I suspect the previous owner had done just that.

To do it properly you need to remove the airbox hose, battery, battery tray, petrol tank, seat , side panels , rear inner mudguard and the electrics so that you can free the airbox enough to do the job properly.

I've never worked on a Himalayan , what's involved in removing the battery ?

 

Jeezus, is this a computer aided design? Or the work of masochists?! 😂 

Battery removal on a Himalayan is nowhere near as bad BUT it looks like all you have to do is remove the side panel and there it is, oh no no no. You will be feckin about trying to move wires and things that are fixed in position for sometime only to discover once they may seem wrestled to reasonable distance that the angle of the battery says NOO 🤣😔

Took an experienced mechanic over 20 minutes before he yielded to my suggestion to remove the seat and go in from the top. 
 

And even then I didn’t have the Spanish available to explain you need a two long screwdrivers to lever it from behind and pull it from the front at the same time 🤣

It’s just really annoying because it looks straightforward and it’s not, you need a minimum of one decent YouTube tutorial before even looking at the fecker 😄

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  • 4 months later...

So Miss America has developed a judder in the clutch, I just did an oil change (easiest option first) and the oil smelt pretty cooked so it might be that the plates are fooked.  I'll see if the fresh oil makes any difference next time I ride it.

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  • 2 months later...

New boots for Miss America today, feckin tyres are hard work when it’s this cold .

 

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The rear is always the hardest so I used the bead breaker on that 

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tyre paste is your friend when mounting the new tyre 

 

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the fronts are always easier 

 

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all done ✔️ I’ll ride it into work tomorrow to check that all is well.

 

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1 hour ago, boboneleg said:

Just fitted this eat cover, it needed a bit of adjustment but well chuffed with it .

 

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I would wait until it’s warm. Mine eventually went a little flat and doesn’t provide the same airflow as before, if any.

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34 minutes ago, Pedro said:

I would wait until it’s warm. Mine eventually went a little flat and doesn’t provide the same airflow as before, if any.

you are not going to eat it are you 

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  • 3 months later...

With my recent problems with the height of Miss America due to the Cogent suspension I decided to see what I could do to lower it and shave some weight to see if it would be easier for me to manage .

 

I had a spare front end and a couple of standard Suzuki shocks so I dug them out and made a start ...........

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The rear shock was fairly easy to do , I just had to remove the rear wheel and shock linkages to make it easier to get out.  Cogent shock on the left , Suzuki shock on the right ..........

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and fitted ...............

 

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Next job was to take the forks out ..................

 

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I started to drain the forks that I had as spare but the crap that came out was an awful colour , I suppose it wasn't really surprising as these forks have been sat around for 10 years :classic_unsure:

 

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Having seen what came out of them I decided to just flush the forks several times until they were clear . I had some spare fork oil of various weights so I just used that to flush them, I wasn't keen on taking the forks apart at this point so after the flushing  I filled them with 10w fork oil and buttoned them up.

Look at the difference in the length between the Cogent DDC equipped forks and standard , both are Suzuki ..............

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35 minutes ago, Pedro said:

Curious as to the difference you see on the bike, Bob.

Also on the difference in handling.

I rode it into work today Pedro, I can flat foot it now and didn't find anything detrimental to the handling .  It turns in a bit quicker but feels perfectly stable 👍

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So with the forks back in it was time to see if I could remove anything to shave some weight.  First to go was the luggage support rails , I can always fit these back on if I need them later.

I dug out the original tank for this bike but it had the locking cap fitted and I never got the keys with the bike.  I tried a few tips to remove it but in the end it needed drilling out ...........

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Then I needed to flush the tank as it had 9 year old fuel in it and now a load of swarf ..............

 

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I left the tank to dry out for a couple of days and ordered a new cap , once it arrived I fitted it to the tank.  The Suzuki comes with a Mikuni BST carb and a fuel tap that has a vacuum line so I had to block that to get fuel to run from the tank to the carb 

 

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Johnny Jiggler was employed to run the fuel from the oversize Acerbis tank to the Suzuki item ..............

 

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Next I fitted the original side panels in place of the sacrificial panels I'd been using, now it was time for a short run to check everything ................

 

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By time I got the end of the lane the fork seals were leaking which didn't really surprise me, so they came back out and I fitted the Cogent forks by moved them up through the top yoke by 50mm.   I will strip the other forks in time now and see what needs repalcing .

Today I rode it into work and was well chuffed to find out that it handled fine. I'm chuffed as I really like this bike , it gives good performance for a single and is one of the best carburatting bikes I've ridden .

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